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Daily News Briefing

May 2015

The Daily News Briefing is no longer being produced, and new Briefings will no longer be added as part of JSH-Online.

Although the Monitor's new premium news product, the Monitor Daily, is not included as part of a JSH-Online subscription, JSH-Online subscribers receive email and web access to the Monitor Daily through May 19 at no additional charge and are also eligible to subscribe to the Monitor Daily at a discounted rate.

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The Christian Science Monitor Daily News Briefing provides an editorially curated perspective on important news of the day. Each issue provides a daily commentary from the editors, abridged versions of five key stories, an Editorial, the Christian Science perspective article, and a Top Headlines column. Insights gained from the Monitor can support and strengthen your prayers for the world. For the latest news and 24/7 access to Monitor content, you can also visit CSMonitor.com.

Football (aka soccer) is destined to become not just popular around the world, but also in the US.

Nuclear negotiations show some progress, but more progress and speedier progress are needed.

Desperate journeys

Human traffickers in Southeast Asia are profiting from the persecution of Rohingyas in Myanmar.

A day of remembrance

It is important to remember that Memorial Day marks more than just the beginning of summer fun.

The fall of Palmyra is a big loss for the Syrian government – and potentially for the world.

Newly released documents indicate the Al Qaeda leader was smart -- but not beyond being outsmarted.

Tactical retreat

The White House is restricting the use of military equipment by police departments, but the underlying tensions in minority communities remain.

Time to rethink Iraq?

The Iraqi Army's loss of Ramadi to the Islamic State group shows that Iraq's center is not holding.

The Pentagon reported an important operation against the Islamic State this weekend. But to 'change the tide,' a deeper sort of strike is required.

Shared concerns and a changing political landscape put old foes on the same side.