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Daily News Briefing

April 2015

The Daily News Briefing is no longer being produced, and new Briefings will no longer be added as part of JSH-Online.

Although the Monitor's new premium news product, the Monitor Daily, is not included as part of a JSH-Online subscription, JSH-Online subscribers receive email and web access to the Monitor Daily through May 19 at no additional charge and are also eligible to subscribe to the Monitor Daily at a discounted rate.

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The Christian Science Monitor Daily News Briefing provides an editorially curated perspective on important news of the day. Each issue provides a daily commentary from the editors, abridged versions of five key stories, an Editorial, the Christian Science perspective article, and a Top Headlines column. Insights gained from the Monitor can support and strengthen your prayers for the world. For the latest news and 24/7 access to Monitor content, you can also visit CSMonitor.com.

A lesson of Vietnam

The increasingly warm relationship between Vietnam and the United States shows that the past need not determine the future.

The spirit of Baltimore

Anger and violence don't define Baltimore. The widespread desire to rebuild and reform do.

Nepal, our neighbor

No place on the planet is “exotic.” A tragedy on the other side of the world is a tragedy in our neighborhood.

New technology may allow us to detect earthquakes like those that hit Nepal and save lives.

Turkey and memory

Turkey must acknowledge the dark periods in its past in order to prevent repeating them.

A futile fight

Today's Sunni-Shiite conflict – like an earlier one – likely will have no victor, no vanquished, and too much suffering.

The contrasting treatment of Hosni Mubarak and Mohamed Morsi raises questions about Egyptian justice.

Disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill are reminders not to trample on our planet.

A growing refugee crisis

Conflicts, collapsed states, and economic hardship cause millions of people to flee for their lives.

Competition sometimes gives rise to anticompetitive behavior. But competition usually solves that problem.