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Daily News Briefing

October 2014

The Daily News Briefing is no longer being produced, and new Briefings will no longer be added as part of JSH-Online.

Although the Monitor's new premium news product, the Monitor Daily, is not included as part of a JSH-Online subscription, JSH-Online subscribers receive email and web access to the Monitor Daily through May 19 at no additional charge and are also eligible to subscribe to the Monitor Daily at a discounted rate.

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The Christian Science Monitor Daily News Briefing provides an editorially curated perspective on important news of the day. Each issue provides a daily commentary from the editors, abridged versions of five key stories, an Editorial, the Christian Science perspective article, and a Top Headlines column. Insights gained from the Monitor can support and strengthen your prayers for the world. For the latest news and 24/7 access to Monitor content, you can also visit CSMonitor.com.

Thomas Menino's legacy won't be found in grand speeches but in the city he worked to improve.

Job 1: Defeat fear

The Islamic State is not yet on the run, but the fear factor is fading.

Beyond containment, hope

Ebola, the Islamic State, and Russia are today's challenges. They can be met and mastered.

Russia's new 'brain drain'

Vladimir Putin's policies are driving out the very people the country most needs.

The hope of democracy

Tunisia and Ukraine are young democracies in troubled neighborhoods. If they endure, the effect would be powerful.

Taiwan is watching Hong Kong

Was Beijing's “one country, two systems” formula a hollow promise?

Terror attacks get attention. They don't change minds.

Less crime, less punishment

Prison populations in the US are falling. Now what about all those prisons?

Tolerate, don't dominate

Iraq's prime minister would make history by leading Iraqis above factionalism

Compassion, not fear

Instead of recoiling from the dangers of Ebola, 'global citizens' should step up assistance to West Africa.