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15    The Revelator lifts the veil from this embodiment of all evil, and beholds its awful character; but he also The sting of the serpentsees the nothingness of evil and the allness of 18God. The Revelator sees that old serpent, whose name is devil or evil, holding untiring watch, that he may bite the heel of truth and seemingly impede the 21offspring of the spiritual idea, which is prolific in health, holiness, and immortality.

Revelation xii. 4. And his tail drew the third part of the 24stars of heaven, and did cast them to the earth: and the dragon stood before the woman which was ready to be delivered, for to devour her child as soon as it was born.

27    The serpentine form stands for subtlety, winding its way amidst all evil, but doing this in the name of good. Animal tendencyIts sting is spoken of by Paul, when he refers 30to “spiritual wickedness in high places.” It is the animal instinct in mortals, which would impel 564 564:1them to devour each other and cast out devils through Beelzebub.

3    As of old, evil still charges the spiritual idea with error’s own nature and methods. This malicious animal instinct, of which the dragon is the type, incites mortals to 6kill morally and physically even their fellow-mortals, and worse still, to charge the innocent with the crime. This last infirmity of sin will sink its perpetrator into a night 9without a star.

    The author is convinced that the accusations against Jesus of Nazareth and even his crucifixion were instigated 12Malicious barbarityby the criminal instinct here described. The Revelator speaks of Jesus as the Lamb of God and of the dragon as warring against innocence. Since Jesus 15must have been tempted in all points, he, the immaculate, met and conquered sin in every form. The brutal barbarity of his foes could emanate from no source except the 18highest degree of human depravity. Jesus “opened not his mouth.” Until the majesty of Truth should be demonstrated in divine Science, the spiritual idea was arraigned 21before the tribunal of so-called mortal mind, which was unloosed in order that the false claim of mind in matter might uncover its own crime of defying immortal Mind.

24    From Genesis to the Apocalypse, sin, sickness, and death, envy, hatred, and revenge, — all evil, — are typiDoom of the dragonfied by a serpent, or animal subtlety. Jesus 27said, quoting a line from the Psalms, “They hated me without a cause.” The serpent is perpetually close upon the heel of harmony. From the beginning 30to the end, the serpent pursues with hatred the spiritual idea. In Genesis, this allegorical, talking serpent typifies mortal mind, “more subtle than any beast of the 565 565:1field.” In the Apocalypse, when nearing its doom, this evil increases and becomes the great red dragon, swollen 3with sin, inflamed with war against spirituality, and ripe for destruction. It is full of lust and hate, loathing the brightness of divine glory.

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