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Concord ExpressA Christian Science Study Resource

    My Beloved Students: — This question, ever nearest 12to my heart, is to-day uppermost: Are we filling the measures of life’s music aright, emphasizing its grand strains, swelling the harmony of being with tones whence 15come glad echoes? As crescendo and diminuendo accent music, so the varied strains of human chords express life’s loss or gain, — loss of the pleasures and pains and 18pride of life: gain of its sweet concord, the courage of honest convictions, and final obedience to spiritual law. The ultimate of scientific research and attainment in 21divine Science is not an argument: it is not merely saying, but doing, the Word — demonstrating Truth — even as the fruits of watchfulness, prayer, struggles, tears, and 24triumph.

    Obeying the divine Principle which you profess to understand and love, demonstrates Truth. Never absent 27from your post, never off guard, never ill-humored, never unready to work for God, — is obedience; being “faithful over a few things.” If in one instance obedience be 30lacking, you lose the scientific rule and its reward: namely, 117 117:1to be made “ruler over many things.” A progressive life is the reality of Life that unfolds its immortal Prin3ciple.

    The student of Christian Science must first separate the tares from the wheat; discern between the thought, 6motive, and act superinduced by the wrong motive or the true — the God-given intent and volition — arrest the former, and obey the latter. This will place him on 9the safe side of practice. We always know where to look for the real Scientist, and always find him there. I agree with Rev. Dr. Talmage, that “there are wit, humor, and 12enduring vivacity among God’s people.”

    Obedience is the offspring of Love; and Love is the Principle of unity, the basis of all right thinking and 15acting; it fulfils the law. We see eye to eye and know as we are known, reciprocate kindness and work wisely, in proportion as we love.

18    It is difficult for me to carry out a divine commission while participating in the movements, or modus operandi, of other folks. To point out every step to a student and 21then watch that each step be taken, consumes time, —  and experiments ofttimes are costly. According to my calendar, God’s time and mortals’ differ. The neo24phyte is inclined to be too fast or too slow: he works somewhat in the dark; and, sometimes out of season, he would replenish his lamp at the midnight hour and 27borrow oil of the more provident watcher. God is the fountain of light, and He illumines one’s way when one is obedient. The disobedient make their moves before 30God makes His, or make them too late to follow Him. Be sure that God directs your way; then, hasten to follow under every circumstance.

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